Ponderings

Forget Suduko and crosswords. Print this list and on your next long haul flight seek the meanings. Let us know your conclusions.

 

1. Is it good if a vacuum really sucks?

2. Why is the third hand on the watch called the second hand?

3. If a word is misspelled in the dictionary, how would we ever know?

4. If Webster wrote the first dictionary, where did he find the words?

5. Why do we say something is out of whack? What is a whack?

6. Why does "slow down" and "slow up" mean the same thing?

7. Why does "fat chance" and "slim chance" mean the same thing?

8. Why do "tug" boats push their barges?

9. Why do we sing "Take me out to the ball game" when we are already there?

10. Why are they called "stands" when they are made for sitting?

11. Why is it called "after dark" when it really is "after light"?

12. Doesn't "expecting the unexpected" make the unexpected expected?

13. Why are a "wise man" and a "wise guy" opposites?

14. Why do "overlook" and "oversee" mean opposite things?

15. Why is "phonics" not spelled the way it sounds?

16. If work is so terrific, why do they have to pay you to do it?

17. If all the world is a stage, where is the audience sitting?

18. If love is blind, why is lingerie so popular?

19. If you are cross-eyed and have dyslexia, can you read all right?

20. Why is bra singular and panties plural?

21. Why do you press harder on the buttons of a remote control when you know the batteries are dead?

22. Why do we put suits in garment bags and garments in a suitcase?

23. How come "abbreviated" is such a long word?

24. Why do we wash bath towels? Aren't we clean when we use them?

25. Why doesn't glue stick to the inside of the bottle?

26. Why do they call it a TV set when you only have one?

27. Christmas, what other time of the year do you sit in front of a dead tree and eat candy out of your socks?

 

Mile High Club

The aviation industry has long used the frisson of flirtation to sell flights, beginning with strict ‘glamour’ criteria for cabin crew on the first commercial flights and continuing through to recent sexy advertising campaigns from airlines such as Virgin.
 

Now a survey from flights comparison site Skyscanner has revealed our romantic associations with flying are still going strong with the trend for “flyrting” – the practice of passengers flirting whilst flying.
The survey of over 1,000 travellers revealed that 45% of passengers admitted to flirting whilst on board a flight, with a third leading to a rendezvous following the flight, and 8% of them resulting in a relationship.
 

Skyscanner employee Karin Noble, a former cabin crew member commented:
“More and more people are now travelling by air so it’s no surprise that flights have become a place to flirt. After all, you are sitting next to someone for an hour or more, and the fact that you’re both travelling to the same place means you already have something in common. Add this to the heightened effect that alcohol can have at altitude and the more relaxed ‘holiday mood’ that many travellers feel, and it tends to give people the courage to flirt with a fellow passenger or even take things further, especially on long haul routes such as flights to Australia.”
More shockingly, for a small minority the flirtations may actually lead to membership of the infamous Mile High Club; a separate survey found that 20% of travellers have joined this risqué association and half of these had done so with a stranger they met on a flight.
 

For those that are not members however it certainly still seems to appeal with a massive 95% of those surveyed admitting they would like to join the Mile High Club, while a Valentine’s Day survey showed that 6% of men claim this was their ideal gift.
 

However, a UK firm offering ‘Mile High’ flights was recently shut down by the CAA after just two years of operation, as they weren’t satisfied that on board safety criteria were being met, and feared the in-flight action could be ‘too distracting’ for pilots.